Relationship activities for teenage girls

The New Rules for Teen Dating

relationship activities for teenage girls

Three girls in softball uniforms celebrating on the field. Team-building activities are fun and easy ways to help teenagers (and adults too!) their thoughts and ideas, develop relationships, and build teamwork and trust. Three girls in softball uniforms celebrating on the field. Team-building activities are fun and easy ways to help teenagers (and adults too!) their thoughts and ideas, develop relationships, and build teamwork and trust. 8. Healthy Relationships Curriculum Discussion Guides. 9. Communicating Effectively. Resolving Conflict. Stepping In. Activities. TABLE OF CONTENTS partner, a figure that far exceeds other types of youth violence.

How easy is it to be one? Do you think these ads would be useful if you were writing an ad for a boyfriend or girlfriend? Why or why not? How do our relationships with friends differ from relationships with boyfriends and girlfriends? Friendship Skills Tell the group that we are going to take a closer look at friendships. Why are friendships important?

relationship activities for teenage girls

Some possible responses might be: Support when you have a problem A companion to do things with Someone to talk to Someone to make you laugh Helps you not feel lonely, helps you feel part of a group Makes you feel good Tell the group that there are some simple skills needed to make and keep friends.

Have each of the skills described below written on cardstock.

Healthy Relationships Toolkit – Teenagers

Ask for volunteers to post these cards in front of the room. Ask youth to help you define each skill. Skills needed to make and keep friends: For example, not sharing a secret. Breaking a confidence breaks trust, which is very important for building a friendship.

relationship activities for teenage girls

Ask the group what trust means. Who is someone they trust? Which one shows people who might hug? Which one shows people who should NOT hug or kiss? Which one shows a person you could ask for help? Which one shows people who might talk about their worries together? Which one shows people who do not know each other?

When is it okay to talk to these people? There are a few times when a person might have to talk to a stranger.

relationship activities for teenage girls

Most Community helpers wear uniforms. Otherwise, one usually does not talk to strangers except under very special and very rare circumstances. One group once suggested in a session that if a very huge rock were falling from the sky, a person might quite appropriately exclaim to a stranger nearby, "Watch out!

We don't get to choose our families. We don't get to choose our teachers, our bosses, or our classmates.

relationship activities for teenage girls

Ask the group to show you a picture of people who they think chose to be in a relationship. Ask the group to show you a picture of people who did not choose to be in a relationship. Tell the group that we often have choices in relationships that are not working too well.

Ask the group how people can work things out in a relationship. Possible responses might be: Ask the youth to give you examples of these strategies. Tell the group that if a person we have a relationship with won't help, then it can be hard to solve problems.

If we have a choice to be in a relationship with the person and we can't fix things, we may decide not to be around that person anymore. What can we do if we do not have a choice about being in the relationship? We might try extra hard to work things out. We may try to spend some time apart if we can. We may ask for help in working out the relationship from another family member, a counselor, a teacher, etc.

relationship activities for teenage girls

Summarize the Activity People have many different types of relationships in their lives. And if you need some time to think something through before you're ready to talk about it, the right person will give you some space to do that. What's an Unhealthy Relationship?

ACT for Youth - Preparing Youth for Adulthood - Helping Youth Build Relationship Skills

A relationship is unhealthy when it involves mean, disrespectful, controlling, or abusive behavior. For some people who have grown up around this kind of behavior it can almost seem normal or OK. Many of us learn from watching and imitating the people close to us. So someone who has lived around violent or disrespectful behavior may not have learned how to treat others with kindness and respect or how to expect the same treatment.

Qualities like kindness and respect are absolute requirements for a healthy relationship. Someone who doesn't yet have this part down may need to work on it with a trained therapist before he or she is ready for a relationship. Meanwhile, even though you might feel bad or feel for someone who's been mistreated, you need to take care of yourself — it's not healthy to stay in a relationship that involves abusive behavior of any kind.

Warning Signs When a boyfriend or girlfriend uses verbal insults, mean language, nasty putdowns, gets physical by hitting or slapping, or forces someone into sexual activity, it's a sign of verbal, emotional, or physical abuse.

Teenage Relationship Abuse - Sexual Abuse

These aren't the only questions you can ask yourself. If you can think of any way in which your boyfriend or girlfriend is trying to control you, make you feel bad about yourself, isolate you from the rest of your world, or — this is a big one — harm you physically or sexually, then it's time to get out, fast. Let a trusted friend or family member know what's going on and make sure you're safe. But even if you know that the person hurting you loves you, it is not healthy.

Ever heard about how it's hard for someone to love you when you don't love yourself? It's a big relationship roadblock when one or both people struggle with self-esteem problems.

Your girlfriend or boyfriend isn't there to make you feel good about yourself if you can't do that on your own. Focus on being happy with yourself, and don't take on the responsibility of worrying about someone else's happiness. What if you feel that your girlfriend or boyfriend needs too much from you? If the relationship feels like a burden or a drag instead of a joy, it might be time to think about whether it's a healthy match for you.

Healthy Relationships Toolkit – Teenagers

Someone who's not happy or secure may have trouble being a healthy relationship partner. Also, intense relationships can be hard for some teens. Some are so focused on their own developing feelings and responsibilities that they don't have the emotional energy it takes to respond to someone else's feelings and needs in a close relationship.