Svg preserveaspectratio meet

A Look At preserveAspectRatio in SVG by Joni Trythall on CodePen

svg preserveaspectratio meet

This tutorial explains how the viewport and view box works in SVG. is first an example with the preserveAspectRatio set to xMinYMin meet. (width>height) meet --> svg preserveAspectRatio="xMidYMid meet" x="0" y="0" viewBox="0 0 " width="20" height="10">

The following elements establish new SVG viewports: Percentage lengths within the content of these elements are not proportional to the dimensions of the graphical effect region.

Why and how `preserveAspectRatio`?

This has some effects similar to a new viewport, resetting the scope of layout for child content. Whether a new SVG viewport also establishes a new additional clipping path is determined by the value of the overflow property on the element that establishes the new SVG viewport. Each attribute and property must specify the used component value type. Example Units below illustrates some of the processing rules for different types of units.

CSS defines 1 inch to be equal to 96 pixels. Therefore, the topmost rectangle, which is specified in inches, is exactly the same size as the middle rectangle, which is specified in user units such that there are 96 user units for each corresponding inch in the topmost rectangle. The bottom rectangle of the group illustrates what happens when values specified in inches are scaled.

Why and how `preserveAspectRatio`? by Taylor Hunt on CodePen

The three rectangles in the middle demonstrate the use of one of the relative unit identifiers, the "em" unit.

The topmost rectangle, which is specified in "em" units, is exactly the same size as the middle rectangle, which is specified in user units such that there are user units for each corresponding "em" unit in the topmost rectangle. The bottom rectangle of the group illustrates what happens when values specified in "em" units are scaled. The three rectangles on the right demonstrate the use of percentages.

The topmost rectangle, which is specified in percentage units, is exactly the same size as the middle rectangle, which is specified in equivalent user units.

svg preserveaspectratio meet

The bottom rectangle of the group illustrates what happens when values specified in percentage units are scaled. Bounding boxes bounding box The bounding box or "bbox" of an element is the tightest fitting rectangle aligned with the axes of that element's user coordinate system that entirely encloses it and its descendants.

Three kinds of bounding boxes can be computed for an element: The object bounding box is the bounding box that contains only an element's geometric shape. For basic shapesthis is the area that is filled. The second part of the preserveAspectRatio attribute value is appended to the first part, separated by a space.

A Look At preserveAspectRatio in SVG

Here are two examples: The following examples all have the width set toheight to 75 and the viewBox attribute set to 0 0 That means that along the x-axis every coordinate unit will correspond to 2 pixels, but along the y-axis every coordinate unit will only correspond to 1 pixel. That could result in a distorted image, but we will see in the following examples how the various preserveAspectRatio settings handle these settings.

That will make sure that aspect ratio is kept, and the view box resized to fit within the viewport. That is, the view box is scaled according to the smaller of the two aspect ratios the y-axis with a ratio of 1. The view box will be positioned in the upper left corner of the viewport because of the xMinYMin part. Here is the code and resulting image: That will preserve aspect ratio, but scale the view box according to the larger aspect ratio the x-axis with ratio 2resulting in an image too big to fit within the viewport.

svg preserveaspectratio meet

The image is said to be "sliced". That means that the view box will fill out the whole viewport, thus distorting the image since the aspect ratio along the x- and y-axis are not the same. Depending on how you want to align the view box within the viewport, you may use different settings.

I will get a bit deeper into how these settings work, but let us first look at an example: