Frodo and sam relationship

Lord of The Rings - Relationship between Frodo and Sam Showing of 83

frodo and sam relationship

I'm rereading LOTR for the first time in many years. When the book starts Sam is the gardener, right? An employee. But they're mates too. The. Samwise "Sam" Gamgee /ˈsæmˌwaɪz ˈɡæmˌdʒiː is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. Dec 13, The relationship between Sam and Frodo is perhaps the truest friendship in all of fiction. "Don't leave me here alone. Don't go where I can't follow.

Simply put, Sam was a man of many parts — he did everything for Frodo, though not yet in as great a degree as later. Aristotle claims that the pleasure friendship arises from selfishness, and as the naming signifies, it is based on pleasure and beauty. It is born of physical or intellectual attraction and dies when the friend changes and ceases to be pleasant or nice to look at.

The self-centeredness of such friendship means that I enjoy myself more when I am with my friend. Pleasure friendship is most closely tied to emotions. It is characterized by a quick start and a quick end. It is typically maintained by young people who are easily driven by their momentary feelings.

But what is it that makes a servant, a mere gardener, so devoted to his master? It is love, his love for Frodo. And love is an essential sign of friendship, for as the philosopher claims, friendship is actually one of the different kinds of love.

Moreover, his admiration for Frodo is very similar to present day worship of the leaders of certain social groups by young people, and that is an exact example of friendship of pleasure as understood by Aristotle.

Likewise, Sam loved Frodo because his personality attracted him. He has ever thought him the wisest and kindest person in the world. He enjoyed serving him, because seeing Frodo happy made him happy, too.

However, here someone may object as to whether this is not also typical for the friendship of virtue — the true friendship. It may seem so, since even Aristotle claims that these two kinds of friendship are much alike NE, book VIII, chapter 6but it has not been put through any struggle yet to test its strength; in peace everything is easier.

  • Frodo and Sam’s Relationship in the Light of Aristotle’s Philia
  • Frodo and Sam's physicality
  • Samwise Gamgee

The friendship seemed rather one-sided. Therefore, the friendship of pleasure fits it better. Frodo, being an orphan whose parents died when he was twelve years old, and who had been raised up by relatives who did not like him much because of his origin, must have felt lonely and neglected until his younger cousins grew up. The Brandybucks, with whom he lived until Bilbo adopted him, disliked him because he was a Baggins like his father, coming from the western part of Shire.

For the Hobbits living in the east part, such as Brandybucks who belonged to the breed called Stoors with a strong Fallohidish strain still to be noted within them, as they often claimed found the Hobbits from the western part belonging rather to Harfoots, as the Bagginses presumably were 1to be queer, and vice versa.

Therefore, even the Hobbits from Hobbiton where Frodo moved, did not really accept him.

frodo and sam relationship

And their distrust was even greater because of the strange behavior of his uncle and his adventures. In any case, it was not easy for him to make friends. Consequently, he must have enjoyed the attendance he received in Bag End from Sam. He must have been pleased that for a change someone admired him, in contrast with the suspicion of others.

Yet his relationship to Sam was cooler. Even though he treated him in a friendly way, from his point of view it was still more a master-servant relationship. This might also have been caused by the age gap between them, but when we consider the age of his other friends, most of them were even younger than Sam, so this could have had only a minor impact.

Anyway, at this stage Frodo did not openly acknowledge Sam to be his friend. Unlike Sam, who seems to have no other known close friends except maybe the Cottons brothers, but we do not know how close they really wereFrodo had several. His dearest friend, whom he loved the most, was definitely Bilbo because they were so much alike. However, being from older and richer families, Sam recognized them as superior.

But Frodo never named Sam as his friend individually, only collectively as a member of the conspiracy. The utility friendship is based on usefulness. A man makes friends with someone when he needs something from him. Its aim is primarily profit. Therefore, such friendship lasts only while the other person provides one with what is needed.

Aristotle says that this type of friendship is most typical for young children or old weak people, who cannot care for themselves on their own and need others to help them. However, it is not restricted only to these ages. It can, of course, occur in other periods of human life, too.

Frodo needs or merely accepts his services, even though some of them he would be able to do on his own. Sam is a useful helper. The philosopher exemplifies this kind of friendship by the relationship of host and guest NE, book VIII, chapter 3which is like a short-term equivalent of the master-servant relationship.

For even if people who pursue friendship because of utility called the object of their need a friend, it would not be meant sincerely. But by this I do not want to say that Frodo was selfish, only that is was not necessary for him to call Sam his friend when his relationship to him was not so deep yet.

frodo and sam relationship

But in spite of his somewhat cooler attitude, sometimes Frodo already showed some deeper concern about Sam, as he did for his friends, which would not be expected from a master towards his servant were their relationship only formal.

For instance, after their first meeting with Elves in the Shire, he doubted whether it was good idea to take him along when he knew his journey led only through peril. Well, after all those years spent with him around and knowing what a big affection Sam had for him, it was natural that his relationship to him grew into something more than only a utility friendship. Development of Their Relationship during the War of the Ring As the story proceeded, we see that their relationship slowly changed.

Since they were bound to spend whole days together and rely on each other in pursuit of their quest, such change is natural and only to be expected. Their intimacy increased and their mutual affection was strengthened by all the struggles they went through. Yet the change is not the same on both sides. The journey provided an opportunity for him to show his care for his master in a new way, unlimited by the peaceful environment of their home and everyday duties. As has been explained, his relationship to Frodo was a friendship of pleasure, for he took pleasure in helping Frodo, being around him and serving him.

frodo and sam relationship

Sometimes it may even seem that although younger in age, Sam cared about him like a parent cares for a child. From the very beginning he watched anxiously over his security and wellbeing. The purpose of everything he did was to help Frodo as much as he could, and this carried on throughout the story.

As he said, he would never mean any harm to Frodo. So even if he did something that he first perceived as contradictory to his love, like when he joined the conspiracy with Pippin and Merry to spy on Frodo, or when he was eavesdropping on his talk with Gandalf, it was only with the best intentions.

This happened in the beginning because he was a simple, inexperienced person; until this time he had never traveled farther than twenty miles away from his home. But later, as he became more aware of life behind the borders of his little country, he realized that a merciful lie or concealment of the truth was harmless and even necessary if he did not want to trouble his master.

So he often used it as they neared Mordor; for instance, when he did not speak the truth about their dwindling food or that he saved his share for Frodo. After this he somehow felt responsible for Frodo. And partially from this promise, in combination with his devotion to his master, there results a determination to follow Frodo no matter what, and his already mentioned willingness to give his life for him, although yet he had no clear idea what peril may await them.

Nonetheless, he made a pact with himself to never leave his master, motivated by some unidentifiable inner feeling that he has to do something before the end.

He confessed it when Frodo, after considering that he should not lead his friend into unknown danger but rather go on his own because the Ring is his alone, indirectly offered him a chance to rethink his decision and stay in the Shire.

I never mean to. Sam even implemented this literally when he actually accompanied Frodo everywhere he went. This statement was the first open demonstration of his conviction, and though it is evidently a motivation of all his doings, it manifested itself in two more situations that were crucial for the subsequent development of the plot.

In the former case, he could have stayed in Rivendell with Elves, since until now meeting them has been his greatest dream and also the original though only assumed reason of his coming with Frodo, or rest there for some time and then return to Hobbiton. But although he had already gained some notion of how dangerous this journey will be, he preferred to go on.

Similarly, in the second case he had a chance for a better destiny than to plod through dying land, starving, straight into the hands of enemy. By now he was well aware of all the peril.

He could have chosen an easier way and gone to Minas Tirith with Boromir and Aragorn At this point of time Sam did not know what happened to the rest of the Fellowship until he was reunited with them after the completion of the quest, and believed that the remaining seven would go to Gondor, since at least the men intended so from the beginning.

Nevertheless, he insisted on following his master, and when Frodo seemed to ignore him, he did not hesitate to jump into water to stop him, even though he could not swim. But while in general his determination proved to be a lucky decision, in one instance it almost meant a definite end to the quest and an absolute disaster for the whole Middle-earth. It was in the passage of Cirith Ungol at the border of Mordor, when he thought his master dead after he had been poisoned by Shelob the giant spider.

He knew that he had to resume the quest. But even more hazardous was his resolution to go to the orc tower full of enemies and save his master when he found out he was only paralyzed. Had he left Frodo to his own fortune and centered only on the task, the quest might have been completed earlier and maybe more easily.

But his love for Frodo was bigger than his moral obligation to the Free Peoples of Middle-earth. Another quality that the journey revealed in Sam, which is closely related to his overall conviction, is vigilance. He became watchful and suspicious of every stranger from the very beginning, and its level remained constant throughout the entire story.

While the other two younger hobbits developed their sense of wariness only slowly, with Sam it seems to come up as soon as they left Bag End. But he actually proved right with Gollum.

It began with the stubborn resolution that if anyone meant any harm to Frodo, he should first fight with him. But since it had not yet come to a direct confrontation with enemies, and there is no any evidence of them fighting with the Black Riders at Weathertop, it is not certain whether he would really be able to strike or give way to fear.

But later, when Frodo was in immediate danger, he forgot his own fears or limitations, like in the scene at the Gate of Moria when Sam remained the only one with clear senses, not paralyzed by fear, and slashed the tentacle that grasped Frodo and tried to pull him underwater.

It has been already noted that at the beginning he thought him to be the best and cleverest person in the world. However, by the time they reached Mordor, he admitted that Frodo was not always perfect and he not only found some of his decisions wrong, but no longer hesitated to show his disagreement openly.

Certainly, their opinions differed the most regarding whether or not to keep Gollum as their guide. But in spite of this change, they have become closer and more intimate than they were before the journey. Sam was still aware of the social difference between him and Frodo and recognized himself as inferior, yet even in this can be spotted a slight difference.

Until their stay in Rivendell, he used it more frequently than after the forming of the Fellowship of the Ring. So it is clear that his relationship to Frodo has developed from mere friendship of pleasure into a deeper friendship.

Frodo, preoccupied by his burden of the Ring, did not much openly manifest what Sam meant to him, so it appears as if his attitude has not developed. However, the contrary is true. He knew that he might die in the attempt to accomplish the quest and he did not want this for his friends, including Sam. He did not want them to suffer because of him and his unfortunate heirloom. Therefore he tried to dissuade them from the journey twice before his departure from the Shire. First, it was during the earlier mentioned situation when he discussed it only with Sam, and then in the house in Crickhollow when the conspiracy was unmasked.

Yet, he did not make much effort to deter them from coming with him. The reason for this is probably that he was afraid to go on his own.

He was actually happy that he did not have to face the peril alone. This shows that the level of concern for his friends was rather low. Had he wholly apprehended how dangerous he and the Ring was for them, he would not trouble himself with explaining it and would rather steal out secretly in the night, probably even leaving Sam behind. But he did not. However, a test of his affection for his friends came soon after, which he nearly failed.

Initially it occurred to him that he could escape with the help of the Ring and leave the other three there. But then his love for his friends won and he did not abandon them. The first thing he asked, after he realized where he was, was: This may seem an insignificant exclamation, but following a month of journeying together, it reveals much about the development of his relationship to Sam and how important he has become to Frodo.

The fact that the first thing he thought about was what happened to his friend, implies that he has started to worry about him. Later, as his awareness of the danger he represents for the fellowship increased, he was becoming still more convinced that he must accomplish the task on his own.

He was determined to leave instantly, without confronting any member of the fellowship. Therefore, invisible with the Ring on, he even pretended not to take any notice of Sam whom he must doubtlessly have seen running towards him to stop him. Again he tried to persuade him not to follow.

Frodo and Sam's physicality | The Tolkien Forum

This was actually the first time Frodo spoke about his feelings to Sam. Based on this, it is obvious that he no longer treated him as a mere servant, but that Sam has become very dear to him, so dear that he would feel guilty if he died because of him.

It is interesting that Frodo did not talk about his feelings and emotions much. This may be a result of being an orphan lacking the love and interest of his relatives who raised him in his childhood 2. Probably it was never easy for him to speak about his feelings, because the people he lived with did not understand him.

And it remained a problem for him even later when he moved to the Bag End and was surrounded by such loving people like Sam. That is why he so seldom acknowledged how much Sam meant to him in comparison with this gardener who, being the simpler one, often told him how much he liked him.

Instead, to show Sam how much he appreciated his services, Frodo preferred subtle but meaningful gestures. But what is more, Frodo was aware that Sam knew him so well that he could usually guess his thoughts and understand him even without words, so he did not need to affirm his love orally.

He did so only in two instances. One is the moment described above, and the other time it is after the Ring has been destroyed. Standing at the hillside of Mount Doom he said: In the past Frodo used to be very secretive, not only about the Ring, just like Gandalf had warned him, but he also used to keep all his personal affairs to himself.

Just to mention one, he often used to wander the country without anyone knowing the reasons for it, which worried his friends.

frodo and sam relationship

He only became a little more open about his plans and intentions with Sam, after he discovered that his servant knew about the Ring as much as himself, yet never spoke a word of it. When he realized that he could rely on him and sees his determination and love, he kept no secrets from him any longer.

Queer Coded: Sam and Frodo ("The Lord of the Rings")

Anyway, it would be pointless since Sam knew him so well. So it is that Sam became the only confidante with whom he could discuss his worries and ideas. For instance, Sam was the only one to whom Frodo presented his very first piece of poetry inspired by his sorrow for the loss of Gandalf. However, in one matter regarding his secretiveness he always remained the same—that although the Ring started to gain ever greater power over him, he never complained, never spoke about what troubled him and how much he suffered.

The nearer they got to Mordor and Mount Doom, the more Frodo was preoccupied with his burden and his diminishing hope of ever completing his quest. Were it not for Sam, Frodo would never have accomplished it, since he gave up hope completely soon after his rescue from the orc tower.

It has been pointed out that before the journey he never called him his friend. He did not consider him to be one, certainly not a close one, for his friendship with Sam was based on utility. There were other people whom he recognized as his best friends. But after what they have gone through and when Sam remained his only companion after the breaking of the Fellowship, their relationship changed. Although to Faramir he presented Sam as his servant and gardener, in private he once named Sam: So, finally he confirmed him to be his friend, moreover, the best of all his friends.

It is because the friendship of utility, which Frodo had for Sam, is less similar to true friendship than the friendship of pleasure, which Sam had for Frodo; therefore it had to undergo a greater transformation to turn into a more valuable type.

Their Relationship after the War of the Ring Now that the Ring was destroyed and the victory appropriately celebrated, the four hobbits returned home to their old lifestyles.

Are Frodo And Sam In Love?

Or at least Frodo and Sam tried to pick up the old life, although it would never be the same because of all the things they have experienced. While Sam aligned to his previous life more easily, Frodo was affected by the long influence of his burden. As a result, he again became withdrawn and did not speak about his feelings much, partially because he did not want to worry Sam.

In addition, his own suffering has taught him how insignificant were many of the problems of his former life, or the current issues of his kinsmen. Consequently, he became almost a pacifist, for which Tom Shippey criticizes himp.

And after a time being a Deputy Mayor, he completely withdrew from public life. Yet, at least the relationship between him and Sam retained its recently gained dimension. So Sam now became an equal master of Bag End. Furthermore, in the end Frodo also named him his heir. Sam, who had become a respectable person, was happy because he could still stay near Frodo and attend to him. He even decided to name his first-born son after his master, as he still called him. However, there appeared an unexpected interference with their relationship.

It came out that, apart from friendly love to Frodo, he kept a romantic love for Rose Cotton, a hobbit girl from his neigbourhood, and his childhood friend. This sudden romantic desire was quite surprising because he had never mentioned her until the third chapter of Book Six, when Sam remembered her for the first time. Presumably, it was the near-death experience as, thirsty and starving, he thought that he would certainly die even if the quest succeeded, that enhanced his love.

And when they finally came home and saw what a mess there was, it seemed that he was unable to decide which one was more important for him at that moment, since Rosie was evidently willing to repay his affection. He turned away and mounted his pony. But as he started off, Rosie ran down the steps. His suspicions were proven right when Gollum betrayed them to the giant spider Shelob.

frodo and sam relationship

After Shelob apparently killed Frodo, Sam drove her off. When a band of orcs approached, Sam was forced to leave the apparently dead Frodo and take the Ring himself, and briefly became a Ring-bearer. He was momentarily tempted by its promise of power, but did not succumb to it, subsequently rescuing Frodo who had only been paralysed from the Orcs who held him captive.

Sam also returned the Ring to Frodo, making him the only Ring-bearer to freely give up the Ring without intervention. The two then journeyed alone through Mordor and into the heart of Mount Doomwhere Gollum attacked Frodo and reclaimed the Ring, only to inadvertently destroy both it and himself by falling into the mountain's lava.

After the hobbits' return home and the Battle of BywaterSam travelled the length and breadth of the Shire replanting trees that had been cut down during Saruman 's brief reign. He used the gift of earth given to him by the Lady Galadrielwhich caused the saplings he planted to grow at an accelerated rate. The small amount remaining he took to the Three-Farthing Stone roughly the centre of the Shire and cast into the air, prompting the bountiful period of growth starting in the spring of the year Shire Reckoning.

The greatest wonder was a young mallorn tree sprouting in the Party Field: Sam and Rosie had 13 children: Sam was elected Mayor of the Shire for seven consecutive seven-year terms and came to be known as Samwise Gardner. Before Frodo left, he gave the estate of Bag End to Sam, as well as the Red Book of Westmarch for Sam to continue, hinting that Sam might also be allowed to travel into the West eventually. He was not seen again in Middle-earth, but Elanor and her descendants preserved the tradition that he went to the Grey Havens and sailed into the West.

As the last of the Ring-bearers, he was entitled to sail across the Sea and be reunited with Frodo in the Undying Lands. Characteristics[ edit ] At the start of The Lord of the Rings Sam, typically for a hobbit, had never before ventured far from the immediate area where he lived.

Unusually for a hobbit, however, since childhood Sam was fond of legends and other fantastical stories. Sam was particularly interested in the Elves, and always hoped to one day see one. Sam was literate, having been taught by Bilbo and Frodo, which was unusual for most hobbits given their rustic culture.

Frodo and Sam’s Relationship in the Light of Aristotle’s Philia – Fellowship & Fairydust

Sam often showed a talent for poetry; after Gandalf's apparent death, Sam added to the poem that Frodo had written about him. Tolkien called Sam the "chief hero" of the saga in one of his letters: Sam and his descendants also became the keepers of the history of the War of the Ring in the form of the Red Book of Westmarch and upheld the memory of events that most 'ordinary' hobbits took little interest in.

Relationship with Frodo[ edit ] During the journey to destroy the Ring, Sam's relationship with Frodo exemplifies that of a military servant or batman to his assigned officer in the British Armyin particular in the First World War in which Tolkien had served as an officer, typically with his own batmen at different times.

As John Garth has written: Officers had a university education and a middle-class background. Working-class men stayed at the rank of private or at best sergeant. A social gulf divides the literate, leisured Frodo from his former gardener, now responsible for wake-up calls, cooking and packing Tolkien maps the gradual breakdown of restraint [through prolonged peril] until Sam can take Frodo in his arms and call him "Mr Frodo, my dear. He did not think of himself as heroic or even brave, or in any way admirable — except in his service and loyalty to his master.

Galbasi comes from the name of the village Galabas.