2 teachers and students relationship

2 teachers and students relationship

Teachers with strong teacher student relationships have more impact on their students' results. Learn Productive Teacher Student Relationships: Element 2. teacher-student relationships are considered an integral part of classroom . Table 2. Average time [sec] for each learning configuration in traditional and When there is a positive teacher-student relationship, students feel is typically associated with advancing a student's achievement by 2 to 3.

2 teachers and students relationship

The ecology of developmental processes. The ecology of human development: Experiments by nature and design. High school dropout and completion rates in the United States: Social capital and dropping out of high school: The Teachers College Record, 4 Applications of social capital in educational literature: Review of Educational Research, 72 1 Educational Psychology, 30 1 Child Development, 72 2 School disengagement as a predictor of dropout, delinquency, and problem substance use during adolescence and early adulthood.

Journal of youth and adolescence, 41 2 Further support for the developmental significance of the quality of the teacher—student relationship.

Journal of School Psychology, 39 4 Life-span development of self-esteem and its effects on important life outcomes. Journal of personality and social psychology, 6 Teacher-child relationships and academic achievement: A multi-level propensity score model approach. Journal of School Psychology. Parent involvement, classroom emotional support, and student behaviors: The Elementary School Journal. Child Development, Urban Education, 34 3 The role of caring in the teacher-student relationship for at-risk students.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

Sociological Inquiry, 71 2 Implementing a teacher—student relationship program in a high-poverty urban school: Effects on social, emotional, and academic adjustment and lessons learned. Journal of School Psychology, 43 2 Teacher-child relationship and behavior problem trajectories in elementary school.

American Educational Research Journal, 48 1 Self-efficacy beliefs in academic settings. Review of Educational Research, 66 4 Representations of relationships to teachers, parents, and friends as predictors of academic motivation and self-esteem. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 14 2 Trajectories of classroom externalizing behavior: Contributions of child characteristics, family characteristics, and the teacher—child relationship during the school transition.

Journal of School Psychology, 43 1 Are effective teachers like good parents? Child Development, 73 1 Sociometric status and adjustment in middle school: The Journal of Early Adolescence, 23 1 Self-motivation for academic attainment: The role of self-efficacy beliefs and personal goal setting. American Educational Research Journal, 29 3 If this were your classroom, you could try to make sure that in future discussions and question-and-answer periods you give longer latency periods to other students as well before moving on.

Give Hints and Clues to Help Students Answer Questions You also communicate positive expectations by giving hints and clues to your students. It is important that we communicate to all our students that we have high expectations for their success, and one way to do this is by giving more hints and clues to all students, especially the low-performing students.

Think about a reading lesson in which a student struggles to sound out a word. If you provide too many hints and clues, you may actually give the student the answer. Also, after a number of hints, it may be that the only student who doesn't know the answer is the one being called on, which ends up being an embarrassing experience. The important point, however, is to use hints and clues with all students to communicate that you have high expectations for the entire class.

This helps build positive teacher-student relations. Tell Students They Have the Ability to Do Well Another way to communicate positive expectations to students is by directly telling them they have the ability to do well. When you tell your students you have confidence that they can handle a difficult assignment or improve their behavior, you impart a very powerful message. Students often will work hard and behave appropriately to prove that your confidence in them is justified.

2 teachers and students relationship

Every child needs to have at least one significant adult in his or her life who believes that he or she can do well. Ideally, children would hear this from their parents, but the sad truth is that is not always the case.

Teachers have the unique opportunity and privilege to communicate daily to a number of students that they believe in them.

What a gift to be able to be that significant adult in even one student's life. Using this strategy might lead a teacher to say this to a student: You've been working very hard on remembering to write down your thinking as you solve math problems, and I know you can transfer that skill to this test.

I'll check back with you later. Once again, this is a positive relations strategy as well as an instructional strategy. You can also let students know that you have positive expectations for them by referring to past successes Kerman et al.

When you tell a student that you know he will behave appropriately at recess because he was successful yesterday, you help build confidence in the student and increase his chance for success. And after a student demonstrates good behavior or academic achievement in a specific situation, telling her you knew she would be successful Kerman et al.

Students need to know that their teachers respect them and have confidence in them.

2 teachers and students relationship

Using these different strategies to consistently communicate your positive expectations will work wonders. We challenge you to begin using one or two of these strategies today to build high expectations and positive teacher-student relations. Correcting Students in a Constructive Way Correcting and disciplining students for inappropriate behaviors is a necessary and important part of every teacher's job.

However, it doesn't have to be a negative part of your job.

2 teachers and students relationship

In fact, you can actually build positive relationships when you correct students. If you don't believe this, think for just a minute about students you have had in the past who came back to school to visit you. Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years.

This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them.

2 teachers and students relationship

The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future. I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time.

If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future. The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust. The goal is to provide a quick, fair, and meaningful consequence while at the same time communicating that you care for and respect the student.

Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: Discuss the incident with Johnny. Begin with fact finding to be sure that you are appropriately correcting the student.

The worst way to affect teacher-student relationships is to unfairly discipline a student. Identify and accept the student's feelings.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

Tell Johnny that you understand why it upset him to hear somebody call his mother a name and that you, too, would be upset if someone maligned your mother. It's important to understand that this step communicates that you respect and understand his feelings but that you are not accepting his actions. Go over with Johnny the different actions he could have taken, such as ignoring the remark or reporting it to a teacher.